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. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
is give an alternative. we need to start telling the people of america what our health care alternative is and we've yet to do that. >> bob, there's no accountability as we've been saying about other issues because of hyper partisan districts. if i'm a gop member of the house and rail against obama care and say let's defund the government, et cetera, et cetera, and maybe public surveys across the country say that individual is out of step, chances are they're not out of step in their own district. >> i think that's true. one of the problems the republican party has now is that it rode the tea party to power in the house in 2010 and now stuck with all those people. i think john is largely right about what sensible republicans want to do. i'm not sure he's right about the ways out. but you have a whole group of folks who might just take this over the cliff. if boehner holds to the rule that he las to have a majority of the majority before he'll bring anything to the floor, you might just have a government shutdown. and sensible people in the republican party like john brabender, carl row
call minds in america is set to join us tonight. we're going to ask larry sabato about what's wrong with the deck kratz today. hillary clinton's presidential chnss and get a look at the big new online course and all about the legacy of john f. kennedy. all of those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report" coming up right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." the federal reserve minutes. did they tell us anything? steve liesman joins us in jackson hole. >> good evening, larry, from jackson hole where the fed is gathering. they're gathering without ben bernanke and mario draghi. the fed is releasing its minutes from the july meeting in which it showed no clear intention as to the tapering in september. the committee is split with a few members saying the fed should be patient before tapering. there was not enough economic data and a few members saying the fed should stick to the plan announced in june. quote, it might soon be time to taper. almost all of the participants were pretty comfortable with the june guidance which said that t
ring and if america is to be a great nation this must become true so let freedom ring let freedom ring. from the mighty mountain to new york let freedom ring from pennsylvania. not only that but let freedom ring from the resort. let freedom ring from the lookout mountain of tennessee. let freedom ring from every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery
, america became more free and more fair. america changed for you and for me. [ bells tolling ] >> reporter: moments before the president spoke, bells rang out across the u.s. to commemorate the moment in 1963 when dr. king uttered his famous phrase. >> as the bells toll today, let us reflect on the bravery, let us reflect on the sacrifice of those who stood up for freedom. >> reporter: among the thousands in washington was edith lee payne who was there 50 years ago as well. the detroit woman who was as a child seen in this iconic 1963 photo reflected on both events. >> why was it important to be here? >> because my mother brought me. and if we're going to continue to make change and make this world better, we have to be a part of that change. >> reporter: the thousands that showed up battled rain, humidity and long security lines, but they stayed to honor the freedom marchers of 50 years ago. john and diana? >> tahman, thank you. >> tough to navigate. president obama opening his mouth and getting some people annoyed. other people saying great. he really had to please a lot of people with t
're on day 25 of filner watch. >>> and honoring america's heroes. first responders front and center. >> there is no second chance in if you're late, it will matter. >> country music superstar tim mcgraw and a new program to empower our firefighters and emts. >> share these stories with you. >> mcgraw joins me live, straight ahead. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. no flight data recorders, no communications and no answers. the big question remains this morning, why did a u.p.s. cargo jet crash just before landing in alabama? right now more than 24 hours after the crash, the cockpit and voice recorders have yet to be recovered. both remain inside the still smoldering wreckage. now, the answers may be in those recorde recorders, since there was no communication from the pilots to air traffic control just before the crash and the only clues available are from witnesses. >> when i got up, it just, i just heard like a boom, boom. and i didn't know what it was. i was just staring out the window and i looked
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
between black and white perceptions. he is the measure of the alienation of black america from white america so he knows if he is outrageous and people attack him there will be a tendency to support him because he is now being beleaguered by the very people who are being viewed as the people who are oppressing. he would make these outrageous comments and he would be attacked by everyone and he would come in town without a single bit of advertising and draw people to a rally because people were rallying around the attacked brother. it's much the same in the arab world. when saddam hussein was making bold and outrageous comments he was praying on the alienation and frustration and anger of people who feel that their histories out of control, that they are being beleaguered by the west, that they have no ability to shape their destiny. and so here's this guy standing up and defending him. james baker understood that. in 1991 he spoke before a congressional testimony and said why don't we do this and why do we do that? james baker said understand what saddam is doing is praying on arab a
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
to be buying. the president of the americas jerry smith joins us exclusively. good to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> thank you for joining us. a good story you are selling more tablets and devices than pcs, right? >> we are proud of that. in the quarter, we had an outstanding quarter. it's a reflection of our strategy, we are now teleselling more phones than tablets. that's a part of our pc plus. we believe we are a device company now. >> i want to ask you about. that all the speculation out there is what is going to happen with blackberry. are you in a position to acquire blackberry in. >> i can't comment on possible acquisitions. i will say right now organically we grew our smartphone business successfully. we will look at potential value and if it fits from a strategy perspective as well. >> so let's look at the difference here him i have a black brry in my hand. can these two merge and be a better device? what do you think, jerry? >> we will keep looking at all opportunities. >> why wouldn't you buy blackberry in they're so popular? what would stop you, seriously in. >> i think
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
electricity to gas to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> 7:53. the amber alert for the missing 16-year-old girl has been extended from california to oregon and washington. investigators say hannah anderson was kidnapped by james dimaggio. a close friend of the family who is suspected of killing her mother and possibly 8 year old brother. a friend of the missing girl says in recent months he told hannah he had a crush on her and made other comments. hannah's father speaking this morning has a message. >> just let my daughter go. let her go home safe. let her be with me and try to mend things from there. >> the body of hannah's mother was found in the ashes of the home along with the body of the boy. he has not been identified but could be hannah's 8 year old brother ethan. authorities believe he may be heading to canada. >> 7:54. >> new information about latest shark sighting. the four foot shark was spotted tuesday. ktvu obtained the
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
'll be leaving my job and heading back to congress. >> his head band say good tell, he's got america on his mind, literally. >>> but first for you this morning, breaking news, there is chaos in egypt, deadly clashes overnight between government security forces and supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. these clashes have left 15 dead, more than 200 injured and those numbers are expected to rise. cnn is covering this story like no other network can, with live team coverage. first let's go to arwa damon, live in the streets of cairo, joining us by phone. arwa, can you hear us? if so, what's the latest? >> reporter: well these clashes are really spreading throughout the entire capital. we were outside around an hour ago when we last talk, the main sit-in site, watching pro-morsi demonstrators, crowds using a bus for cover, trying to move forward on an overpass to join those demonstrators that are at the main sit-in site. now we're in another part of cairo where we saw tear gassing, what sounded like gunshots. this is another area where there is a fairly large crowd of pro-morsi demonstrators
this. that is not the way you do things in the united states of america. you have this tremendous natural inclination to think of all the reasons why you can't do it, you have to do it. that is where we were. >> after the swearing-in, in the first few hours or days were there any offices or persons in authority, that this was in fact a done deal? >> i don't -- i think there were some people who came to the capital and next morning who had not seen this on tv, is lee curtis peer? she is one, who showed up for work the next morning and didn't know this had happened and yet the world had turned upside down. >> the perception was the governor -- >> very new short-term receptionist in governor blanton's front office and worked for governor alexander and fortress the government for 30 plus years. >> on that question, one, based on bill koch's advice, i asked the new cabinet members to take their offices that make no decisions between the swearing-in on wednesday and saturday and those decisions could not be challenged later by anybody so we tried to minimize that but the question you as
america, you had no idea. it angers me because there's a responsibility there to the people investing in these companies, listed on that exchange, and, you know, to make sure they're aware of exactly what was going on. and they were left out. >> i think in fairness to greifeld it would be a question of priorities in his view. probably you have a relatively small team, the job has got to be to ensure that financially nobody gets hurt rather than appearing on cable television i think is the point he's trying to make. >> no question. i absolutely agree with that. i'm not saying that. i'm saying if you're sitting in the middle of the country you have no idea what's locked up and why. the press is the only conduit of information to you. i would say that we had an issue with facebook. we had an issue with the flash crash. we had an issue yesterday with what occurred on the nasdaq, technological issue. what i have an issue with is how it's communiqued to the public and how mom and pop in middle america are actually going to get informed on that and they should be informed because they're the
develop it. they bought it. $300 million gets you $10 billion. >> awesome. >> welcome to america. >>> now to the markets. and the week ahead. director of fx strategy at bks management and bob ruska is fao economics chief economist. bob, i used to worry that, you know, everything's supposed to just go perfectly according to schedule for the fed to start tapering. and helle is going to be on saying we're going from three years to 3%. you're not sure it's a slam dunk that things keep improving. you think housing looks weak and there's other numbers that aren't cooperating with the fed in terms of showing that we're getting above stall speed. >> the backtrack and new home sales last week was unexpected. it was severe. and it was widespread. and, of course, because new home sales are listed at the time you sign the contract, whereas existing home sales don't get posted until after you close the deal, you see the impact of interest rates and new home sales -- >> you already see it. >> and so yeah. you saw this big decline. and you also saw that average home prices continue to go up or median ho
of america, can i ask you about that industry? obviously the billionaires are advancing on individual titles. you see bezos with "the washington post." the koch brothers may be coming in. warren buffett has been advancing into newspapers. what's the future of the industry in the country. i know you've done studies of how revenue streams ever changing. will it be as strong as it is in two decades? >> it's tremendous you're getting the interest in the investment from very savvy, very smart people from multiple backgrounds. the entire media landscape absolutely is transitioning. digital is changing the way all of us interact with media. i believe that newspapers are uniquely well positioned to take advantage of that transformation. we have unique content whether it's an opportunity newspaper who is covering an event, a sports event, city council that no one else covers, or a national or global brand like "the washington post," like "the new york times." the amount of unique, original content generated by newspapers surpasses any other media and whether it's delivered in print, in digital, onlin
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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